Edward, My Son (George Cukor, 1949)

This review is part of our Auteurs Gone Wild series. The movie will screen at…

Peter Ibbetson (Henry Hathaway, 1935)

“We begin with gin bitters and barmaids and end up with an aching head.” This story of a love between children, half-remembered and unknowingly re-enacted by adults, is weird at every turn.

A Countess From Hong Kong (1967)

Perhaps Countess really is Chaplin’s greatest work, his most personal and poetic; in the words of Andrew Sarris, “the quintessence of everything Chaplin has ever felt.” And indeed much of Chaplin’s prior films echo on through this one…

Auteurs Gone Wild

At Anthology Film Archives in New York, David Phelps has curated a nifty new series called…

You’re Nothing to Me Until You’re Everything: Romance & Enchantment in American Hustle

To love life, in Russell’s self-described trilogy of emotion, reinvention, and enchantment, was to flout decorum. Characters fell in love at the drop of a hat, not because it made sense but because it seemed crazy…

Do Not Enter

Napoleon Wilson (Darwin Joston) is sentenced to death and is therefore a man “with no future.” Like Snake Plissken in Escape from New York, who everyone takes for dead, he is condemned by life…

An Interview with John Carpenter

I lived in Chicago between 2004 and 2012. John Carpenter’s last movie, The Ward, didn’t…

John Carpenter’s Halloween (1978)

Michael Myers isn’t just some goblin from the woods who only exists to torture us, he’s a representation of our inability to control, estimate or even understand the impact we have on people or our surroundings…

“What is Empathy?”: Motherhood in Village of the Damned

While other genres of film have often shied away from female narratives, fears and concerns, horror has always embraced our stories.